\1./Carnival in the Eye of the Storm - War / Art / New Technologies: KOSOV@http://projects.pnca.edu/kosovo/conference.html and Paul Vangelisti, "Collage as language: further thoughts on 'Events'," in Katherine Hoffman, Collage:critical views, Ann Arbor, UMI Research Press, 1989, describes his own experiences working with collage poetry and the effect this had on him - essentially a move from "a certain 'tragic' ethos or stance for which the desire to write verse preordained" [him] to "the salvage in Portfolio is precisely comic, an assemblage of social and personal contexts within which poetic language may be renewed...in choosing to play with this phenomenon, I find my poetry redefining itself..."

\2./"Magic, shamanism, esoterism, the carnival, and 'incomprehensible' poetry all underscore the limits of socially useful discourse and attest to what it represses: the _process_ that exceeds the subject and his communicative structures. But at what historical moment does social exchange tolerate or necessitate the manifestation of the signifying process in its 'poetic' or 'esoteric' form? Under what conditions does this 'esoterism,' in displacing the boundaries of socially established signifying practices, correspond to socioeconomic change, and, ultimately, even to revolution? And under what conditions does it remain a blind alley, a harmless bonus offered by a social order which uses this 'esoterism' to expand, become flexible, and thrive?" Julia Kristeva, Revolution in poetic language, NY, Columbia University Press, 1984, p. 16.

"Hence what provides the affirmative moment of rejection and ensures its renewal is not the object that is produced, i.e., the metonymic object of desire; it is, instead, the process of its production or, let us say, its productivity. Within this process, the object is not a boundary to be reached but merely the lower threshold allowing rejection to be articulated as social practice." ibid. p. 177.

"A becoming wasp of the orchid, and a becoming orchid of the wasp." A Thousand Plateaus: Capitalism and Schizophrenia, Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari, Minneapolis, Uinv. Of Minnesota Press, 1987.

"Many people have a tree growing in their heads, but the brain itself is much more a grass than a tree." ibid., p. 15. "Why not invent a story: "The Man with the Wicked Tree in His Head"? Something will come to mind: I will die only if I can no longer invent anything. I am dead when I am silent." Diggelmann, W. (1979). Schatten Tagebuch eine Krankheit (Shadows, diary of an illness}. Zuerich: Benziger. Quoted in Dreifuss-Kattan, E. (1990). Cancer stories: Creativity and self-repair. Hillsdale, NJ: The Analytic Press.


Jimmie Dale Gilmore
:

"Rain don’t fall for the flowers.

It just falls.

Rain just falls."

\7./ "I had always assumed in some vague way that outlines were 'real'... looking at objects around me. When really looked at in relation to each other their outlines were not clear and compact, as I had always supposed them to be, they continually became lost in shadow... how was it possible to have remained unaware of this fact for so long? Second, why was such a great mental effort necessary in order to see the edges of objects as they actually show themselves... "I noticed that the effort needed in order to see the edges of objects as they really look stirred a dim fear, a fear of what might happen if one let go one's mental hold on the outline which kept everything in its place; and it ws similiar to that fear of a wide focus of attention "the outline represented the world of fact, of separable touchable solid objects; to cling to it was therefore surely to protect oneself against the other world, the world of imagination."

"I noticed that the effort needed in order to see the edges of objects as they really look stirred a dim fear, a fear of what might happen if one let go one's mental hold on the outline which kept everything in its place; and it was similiar to that fear of a wide focus of attention."

"the outline represented the world of fact, of separable touchable solid objects; to cling to it was therefore surely to protect oneself against the other world, the world of imagination."

"I began to discover that there were a multitude of ways of perceiving, ways that were controllable by what I can only describe as an internal gesture of the mind. It was as if one's self-awareness had a central point of intensest being, the very core of one's I-ness. And this core of being could, I now discovered, be moved about at will" Marion Milner, A Life of One's Own.

Julia Kristeva, "Intertextuality and Literary Interpretation," Julia Kristeva: Interviews, NY, Columbia University Press, 1989, p.193. "If one takes into account musicality, rhythmicity, alliteration, and so on, this type of writing is obviously a temptation to go down as far as possible toward the semiotic, toward the confrontation of the subject with the object of loss, nostalgia, melancholia - in other words, that maternal form which may be conjured up as a dead mother, an absent mother. And it is an attempt to go down - note that the poet [Nerval] compares himself to Orpheus descending into hell - an attempt that is totally vulnerable because it assumes the possibility of self-loss, and at the same time accurate, because the poet pursues the vulnerability of the psyche experiences to the very edge of nonmeaning. But what one can see is that when the poet feels he has won out in this regressive quest, he expresses his triumphant emergence with a narrative, or at least with the opening of a narrative...use an 'I'...he begins to tell a story in which, instead of mythical, esoteric, ambivalent, and indiscernible characters, there appear two aspects of the feminine figure:...the mental and the carnal, the sublime and the sexual..It is as though from that point onward one is dealing with protagonists in conflict, and beginning to tell a story."

"Collage relations transform the simple, historical finality of 'end' into a complex structure of overlapping edges, each now capable of expressing a form of desire. At 'an end - of roses,' an evocative 'it'....Now the art object itself discloses a life of the rose, capable of synthesizing masculine and feminine in a complex structure of broken edges....capable of preserving that imaginative space in which sexual identities can blend and sexual possession becomes a form of renewing the other's distinctness." Charles Altieri, Painterly abstraction in modernist American poetry, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1989.